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Blue Tit: Bird Identification, Habitat & Nesting

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4th February 2021

Blue Tit Identification

Length: 12 cm

Easily identified as it is the only tit with blue wing, tail and crown. The chest is yellow and the blue tit has white cheeks. A black line runs through the eye, round the nape and cheeks. A white border surrounds the blue crown, while the back is a greenish colour, with yellow colouration on the rump. The bill is black with a brownish tip, legs are a deep slate blue.
The female has a slightly less vivid colouration.

Young blue tits have have more greenish-brown upper parts and yellowish cheeks.

Blue Tit Call & Song

Most typical of the many calls is a scolding ‘tsee-tsee-tseet’. Song is a cheery ‘tsu-tsuhu-hu’.

Reproduction

Breeding starts from mid-April. They nest in holes or cavities, usually in a tree or wall, but also in banks and nest boxes. A nest is a cup of moss, leaves, hair and grass which is lined with down, feathers and hair. The female builds the nest and lay seven to twelve (sometimes five to sixteen) eggs. They are a smooth glossy white with a variable amount of purple-red or reddish-brown speckles. The female alone will incubate the eggs for twelve to sixteen days. Both tend the young who remain in the nest for fifteen to twenty-three days.

Blue Tit Nesting Habits

Blue tits nest in holes in trees, and you might also find them in a nest box in your garden. They nest between March and June, laying between five and twelve eggs which are white with red flecks. These hatch after two weeks of incubation, the young fledge after 18 days and are fully independent within four weeks. Blue tits may have one or two broods per year but this depends on the availability of food around their habitat.

Blue Tit Habitat

Blue tits like areas with scattered trees, including town parks and gardens. Also common in hedgerows.

Natural Food

Mainly insects and larvae, also fruits.

Where to Feed

Feeder – Ideally above 1m in height

Table – Open topped or covered

Ground – Not Suitable